Weekly artist series: Week 6 Part 3 of 3 THE DOOR #Basquiat #arttherapy

Week 6 Part 3 JEAN MICHEL BASQUIAT

Draw a door.

Take out the words you wrote in Part 2:

Pull out some words.  Make a poem.  Write the poem on the door.

Invite a guest through the door to do an entry in your journal.  I was so honored to have my dear friend, Darcy G., add a page reflecting on Basquiat.

You are very welcome. Thank You for inviting me through your door and into The Wonderful World of Kat, The tea, The cheese cubes and crackers and the entertainment of cats and bird and Tobey the great! The basket and buttons that sent me whirling back to when I was a foster child stealing moments in a strange room. So many doors we have passed through only to stand in another. I wish the view were the same on both sides. – Darcy

Next artist:

Willem de Kooning 1904-1997

See also:

35 PART daily journal exercise

Weekly artist exploration/journaling series INTRO

Weekly artist exploration/journaling series Week 1 parts 1-6 FRIDA KAHLO

Weekly artist exploration/journaling series Week 2 parts 1-6 PICASSO

Weekly artist exploration/journaling series Week 3 parts 1-5 LISA LARSON

Weekly artist exploration/journaling series Week 4 parts 1-3 GEORGE GROSZ 

Weekly artist exploration/journaling series Week 5 parts 1-4 FAITH RINGGOLD

Weekly artist series Week 6 Part 1 BASQUIAT: A list of musts

Weekly artist series Week 6 Part 2 BASQUIAT: Downtown 81

Weekly artist series: Week 6 Part 2 DOWNTOWN 81 #Basquiat #arttherapy

Week 6 Part 2 JEAN MICHEL BASQUIAT

Downtown 81 (a.k.a New York Beat Movie), shot in 1980-1981, was directed by Edo Bertoglio, written and produced by Glenn O’Brien with post-production in 1999-2000 by Maripol,  It is a rare real-life snapshot of ultra-hip subculture of post-punk era Manhattan. Starring Jean-Michel Basquiat and featuring such early Village artists as James Chance, Amos Poe, Walter Steding, and Tav Falco, the film is a bizarre elliptical urban fairytale. [source]

Watch the film and immerse yourself in the sounds.  Basquiat used the city as his canvas.

Take snapshots of your downtown.  I work on the Downtown Eastside, so I’ll take photos there.

Write for 10 minutes, just letting words come as you look at your snapshots, listen to the movie soundtrack and just let out what comes out onto paper.  Tomorrow we will use these words.

See also:

35 PART daily journal exercise

Weekly artist exploration/journaling series INTRO

Weekly artist exploration/journaling series Week 1 parts 1-6 FRIDA KAHLO

Weekly artist exploration/journaling series Week 2 parts 1-6 PICASSO

Weekly artist exploration/journaling series Week 3 parts 1-5 LISA LARSON

Weekly artist exploration/journaling series Week 4 parts 1-3 GEORGE GROSZ 

Weekly artist exploration/journaling series Week 5 parts 1-4 FAITH RINGGOLD

Weekly artist series Week 6 Part 1 BASQUIAT: A list of musts

Weekly artist series: Week 6 Part 1 A LIST OF MUSTS #Basquiat #arttherapy

Week 6 Part 1 JEAN MICHEL BASQUIAT

Jean-Michel Basquiat (December 22, 1960 – August 12, 1988) was an American artist.  He began as a graffiti artist in New York City in the late 1970s and evolved into a Neo-expressionist painter during the 1980s.[source].

I don’t think about art when I’m working. I try to think about life.

This week we dive into the delicious and therapeutic world of studying Basquiat.  At least, I find it therapeutic.

Today, we do a series of MUSTS [note how I don’t write should.  I don’t like that word.  With must, I’m implying encouragement, enthusiasm, research]:

MUST READ:

Emmerling, L. (2003) Basquiat, Cologne, Germany: Taschen

MUST STUDY:

Do some research.

MUST VISIT: 

MUST LISTEN:

MUST VIEW [my favorite film clip ever]:

MUST NEWS:

FEB 14, 2012 boston.com

LONDON—Thirty years ago, artist Jean-Michel Basquiat secretly signed one of his paintings in invisible ink, says Sotheby’s auction house, which discovered the hidden autograph as it was preparing the painting for sale.

Sotheby’s experts uncovered the secret this month as they were examining “Orange Sports Figure,” which goes on sale Wednesday. The vibrant image of an abstract crowned figure is estimated to be worth between 3 million pounds and 4 million pounds ($4.7 million and $6.3 million). Keep reading…

MUST DO:

Draw a portrait of Basquiat in your journal.  Try a realistic take.  Improvise.  Be loose.

Now redo it in a Basquiat style.

MUST EXTRAS:

My study of Basquiat’s style by adding a layer of white acrylic onto ground layer of china marker, acrylic, varnish:

 

See also:

35 PART daily journal exercise

Weekly artist exploration/journaling series INTRO

Weekly artist exploration/journaling series Week 1 parts 1-6 FRIDA KAHLO

Weekly artist exploration/journaling series Week 2 parts 1-6 PICASSO

Weekly artist exploration/journaling series Week 3 parts 1-5 LISA LARSON

Weekly artist exploration/journaling series Week 4 parts 1-3 GEORGE GROSZ 

Weekly artist exploration/journaling series Week 5 parts 1-4 FAITH RINGGOLD

Bibliophile: #GRAFFITI. #streetart

Cooper, M., Chalfant, H. (2009) Subway Art- 25th Anniversary Edition, San Francisco, CA: Chronicle Books

Almqvist, B., Lindblad, T.B., Jacobsen, M., Sjöstrand, T. (2007) Gates of Graffiti, Åstra, Sweden: Dokument Förlag (now Dokument Press)

Stewart, J. (2009) Graffiti Kings- New York City Mass Transit Art of the 1970s, New York, NY: Melcher Media

Emmerling, L. (2003) Basquiat, Cologne, Germany: Taschen

Ganz, N. (2004) Graffiti World- street art from five continents, New York, NY: Abrams

Ganz, N. (2006) Graffiti Women- street art from five continents, New York, NY: Abrams

Gastman, R., Neelon, C., Smyrski, A. (2007) Street World- urban art and culture from five continents, New York: NY: Abrams

Jacoby, A. (ed.) (2009) Street Art San Francisco- Mission Muralismo, New York, NY: Abrams

Lewisohn, C. (2008) Street Art- The Graffiti Revolution, New York, NY: Abrams

Jacobson, M. (2000) They Call Us Vandals- Swedish Graffiti, Åstra, Sweden: Dokument Förlag (now Dokument Press)

Banksy (2005) Banksy- Wall and Piece, London, UK: Century (Random House)

Martinez, Scape (2009) Graff: the art and technique of Graffiti, Cincinnati, Ohio: Impact Books

Smith, K. (2007) The Guerilla Art Kit, New York, NY: Princeton Architectural Press

Mosquito Creek, North Vancouver BC, 2008 (local artists):

…meanings women will bring with them to the walls… #GraffitiWomen #streetart #MissVan

Graffiti Women, Nicholas Ganz (Abrams NY, 2006)

Female writers have always been in the vanguard of the graffiti movement, though often shunted to the sidelines by their male counterparts. This exhaustive volume places them front and center, featuring 1,000 full-color illustrations from some of the world’s most prominent artists, including Brazil’s Nina, Japan’s Sasu, Mexico’s Peste, and the Americans Lady Pink, Swoon, and Miss 17. Two eight-page fold-out collages, a fold-out poster jacket, and an authoritative text round out the impressive package. The first and only comprehensive survey of its kind, this book is sure to attract and expand upon the wide and enthusiastic readership that made Graffiti World such a runaway success. (source)

Miss Van:

Painting on walls allows me to keep my freedom; as it is illegal, there is no censorship. It is also a challenge, since each time I paint on a wall there is the risk of seeing my work erased. Since I like moving around and meeting people, so I prefer painting in the street. It also enables me to make my art accessible to a larger public audience. (source)

 

Art Book Quote of the Day from “Street Art- the #Graffiti Revolution”

Street Art- the Graffiti Revolution by Cedar Lewisohn (2008), Harry N. Abrams

Brassaï became interested in graffiti during his flâneur-like wanderings through the city at night.  His enthusiasm for art on the streets was in some ways a revolt against the interest shown in African and Oceanian art by the mainstream taste-makers and other artists of the time.  The idea that the art on the street, right outside people’s doors, was equally as interesting as that being exoticised by the bourgeoisie was as radical then as it is now.  In this sense, Brassaï was drawing parallels between these two forms of creativity.  Both he and the Surrealists were greatly interested in anonymous art forms such as graffiti that were considered worthy of attention, and this fitted with their ideas of how art should function. (p. 29)

See some of my STREET ART from today: POST STREET