Weekly artist exploration/journaling series: Week 3 Part 2 THE ABC GIRLS #LisaLarson #arttherapy

WEEK 3 Part 2: Lisa Larson

Among the most popular Lisa Larson stoneware figures is the collection ABC-Flickor (ABC Girls). When they were first released they caused much debate, since some critics saw them as depicting women with “such lack of respect”, but they quickly become extremely popular, especially among women! SOURCE

Amalia, Beata, Charlotta, Dora, Emma

I LOVE these women.  They are gorgeous, free, relaxed, happy.

Now draw these lush beautiful women.  Use them as inspiration to be confident, secure.  LOOOOOSE.  FAST.  Only give yourself 15-30 sec per page MAX.

See also:

35 PART daily journal exercise

Weekly artist exploration/journaling series INTRO

Weekly artist exploration/journaling series Week 1 parts 1-6 FRIDA KAHLO

Weekly artist exploration/journaling series Week 2 parts 1-6 PICASSO

Weekly artist exploration/journaling series Week 3 LISA LARSON preface

Weekly artist exploration/journaling series Week 3 Part 1 LISA LARSON: This is Lisa

Weekly artist exploration/journaling series: Week 3 Part 1 This is Lisa #LisaLarson #arttherapy

WEEK 3 Part 1: Lisa Larson

Lisa Larson is a Swedish ceramic designer who started at Gustavsberg Porcelain Factory in 1953. Since 1980 she works as a freelance designer and sculptural artist.

Browse among Lisa’s classic designs and unique work and read a little more about her and the current production at Keramikstudion Gustavsberg. Latest news of exhibitions and events, new projects and products will be published here and you can contact Lisa with questions. Visit the on-line shop, where some of Lisa Larsons most loved figures are for sale and exclusive offers will be available.

SOURCE

I was raised with the art of Swedish designer, Lisa Larson at Gustavsberg.  It seemed that any household I visited would have a little figurine by her.  Especially popular was her little cat:

To me, she is the epitomy of the Scandinavian aesthetic.  Whimsical, simple, professional.

I inherited the following two pieces from my mom.  Needless to say, I treasure them, voraciously.

Emma from the ABC Girls Series

To centre ourselves and get into this week’s exploration, write for 15 minutes, stream of consciousness.

   

Explore Lisa online and see what you can find.  Make yourself familiar!

Lisa makes delightful sketches.  I am particularly taken by “I Duvslaget, 1959.”

Note how Lisa and Picasso have a lot in common as to how they approach form.

I will be using my book, Lisa Larson: Amongst Lions and Angels, as a source this week.

Coming up:

Part 2 The ABC Girls

Part 3 Animals

Part 4 Humans and Scenes

Part 5 Form

Part 6 Portraits

 

See also:

35 PART daily journal exercise

Weekly artist exploration/journaling series INTRO

Weekly artist exploration/journaling series Week 1 parts 1-6 FRIDA KAHLO

Weekly artist exploration/journaling series Week 2 parts 1-6 PICASSO

Weekly artist exploration/journaling series Week 3 preface LISA LARSON

THIS WEEK on artist exploration/journaling series: #LisaLarson #arttherapy

Journaling is really helping me stay focused.  Personal art therapy.

WEEK 3 INTRO: Lisa Larson

I am so inspired by the brilliant Swedish designer, Lisa Larson at Gustavsberg and I can’t wait to explore her work and my relationship to it this week.

Lisa Larson, 1959

As I’m busy with my art event today, I’ll do part 1 tomorrow!

As an intro, I wanted to share the visual connection I just discovered between Picasso and Lisa this past week.

See also:

35 PART daily journal exercise

Weekly artist exploration/journaling series INTRO

Weekly artist exploration/journaling series Week 1 parts 1-6 FRIDA KAHLO

Weekly artist exploration/journaling series Week 2 parts 1-6 PICASSO

Weekly artist exploration/journaling series: Week 2 Part 6 PORTRAIT COFFEE DATE #Picasso #arttherapy

WEEK 2 PART 6: Picasso

Last part before we move onto our third artist, Lisa Larson!

Invite your journal and a friend out for coffee and draw while you chat.  In Picasso-esque style.

I had the luxury of spending an hour and a half with my mentor and my dear friend, Laura Mack:

Self-portrait:

See also:

35 PART daily journal exercise

Weekly artist exploration/journaling series INTRO

Weekly artist exploration/journaling series Week 1 parts 1-6 FRIDA KAHLO

Week 2 Part 1- PICASSO

Week 2 Part 2 PICASSO: BREATHING

Week 2 Part 3 PICASSO: ART ABOUT ART

Week 2 Part 4 PICASSO: THE SILENT STUDIO

Week 2 Part 5 PICASSO: INFLUENCE

Weekly artist exploration/journaling series: Week 2 Part 5 INFLUENCE #Picasso #arttherapy

WEEK 2 PART 5: Picasso

I can’t imagine my world, or our world for that matter, without the presence of PICASSO.  Where do you see Picasso’s influence?  Write about it or doodle in a Picasso cubist style.  Immerse yourself.

Here are just a few fun Picasso-isms:

My cubist sock monkey:

My cubist sock bird:

My Guernica sock monkey:

My art event poster with obvious Picasso references:

One of my favorite books on the subject: A Sum of Destructions- Picasso’s Cultures and the Creation of Cubism by Natasha Staller (Yale University Press, 2001).

Picasso’s ceramics are a perfect segway to our next artist, Lisa Larson.

Later today:

Portrait in Picasso style.

Friday:

Lisa Larson!

See also:

See also:

35 PART daily journal exercise

Weekly artist exploration/journaling series INTRO

Weekly artist exploration/journaling series Week 1 parts 1-6 FRIDA KAHLO

Week 2 Part 1- PICASSO

Week 2 Part 2 PICASSO: BREATHING

Week 2 Part 3 PICASSO: ART ABOUT ART

Week 2 Part 4 PICASSO: THE SILENT STUDIO

Weekly artist exploration/journaling series: Week 2 Part 4 THE SILENT STUDIO #Picasso #arttherapy #wherewecreate

WEEK 2 PART 4: Picasso

Today think about the space where you create.  Maybe take a photo of where you are when you create.  Personally, I can be anywhere as long as I have some supplies.  Being a mom, I have trained myself to work “in total seclusion” in the midst of total chaos and I have no problem with noise and distractions.  Maybe I thrive on it?

But that being said,  I must remind myself that silence is important.

So today, sit in you creative space [wherever you happen to be in the moment] and be silent.  Then start to write or draw.  It can be anything.  But I suggest a bird.  Or a cat.  Stream of consciousness.  For at least 15 minutes.  In a quiet space.

 And mediate on Picasso.  His creative space.

I was so lucky to find the book  The Silent Studio (1st edition, 1976) by David Douglas Duncan at Vancouver’s Macleods’s Books (451 Pender Street) a few years ago.

The book itself is a work of art.  Filled with photos by Duncan of Picasso’s studio after his death in 1973.  Haunting, sad, magical, silent.  The book (no captions and mainly photos) is a love letter to Picasso’s last wife Jacqueline Roque.

today, at Notre-Dame de Vie,

Jacqueline’s flock of sheep

grazes beneath olive trees

of a studio now locked,

while Igor appears to watch

for someone he never knew


Jacqueline nearly perished after Picasso died Sunday noon, April 8th, 1973. For two years she languished in total seclusion…

Everyone tried to shield Jacqueline from the obvious agony of having professionals, court-ordered, inside her home cataloguing everything, even the contents of Pablo’s and her clothes closets.  Only rarely was a voice heard in that enormous house, then it was muted.  The experts have now returned to Paris.  Now it’s over.  She seems so relieved and exhausted. (from Preface)

Later today:

Picasso’s Influence.

Thursday:

Self-portrait.

Friday:

Lisa Larson!

See also:

See also:

35 PART daily journal exercise

Weekly artist exploration/journaling series INTRO

Weekly artist exploration/journaling series Week 1 parts 1-6 FRIDA KAHLO

Week 2 Part 1- PICASSO

Week 2 Part 2 PICASSO: BREATHING

Week 2 Part 3 PICASSO: ART ABOUT ART

David Douglas Duncan’s portrait of Jacqueline teaching Picasso a ballet routine in Picasso’s studio

Gabby Bernstein talks about sitting back and receiving, knowing when to take action and when to be still.  Stillness is sometimes the greatest action.

Weekly artist exploration/journaling series: Week 2 Part 3 ART ABOUT ART #LesDemoiselles #Picasso #arttherapy

WEEK 2 PART 3: Picasso

Choose your favorite Pablo Picasso piece:

I chose Les Desmoiselles d’ Avignon

Now open your journal wide and use 2 full pages to reproduce LOOSELY the full piece or part of it.

INGEST/DIGEST/REGURGITATE it.

ART ABOUT ART.

I’m using china marker, dry pastel and, of all things, laundry stain remover spray.

Take a few minutes to write why you chose the piece and what reproducing it means to you.


Tomorrow:

The Silent Studio

See also:

35 PART daily journal exercise

Weekly artist exploration/journaling series INTRO

Weekly artist exploration/journaling series Week 1 parts 1-6 FRIDA KAHLO

Week 2 Part 1- PICASSO

Week 2 Part 2 PICASSO: BREATHING

Weekly artist exploration/journaling series: Week 2 Part 2 BREATHING #Picasso #arttherapy

WEEK 2 PART 2: Picasso

As we prepare for copying a favorite piece by Picasso, we’ll just have Picasso (as we did with Frida) as a companion as we check in with ourselves.  Write for 15 minutes about where you are in the moment.  Just stream of consciousness.  BREATHE PICASSO

Tomorrow we do a “reproduction,” which you’ll recall I like to describe as INGEST/DIGEST/REGURGITATE.  To practice getting in the frame of mind, quickly sketch while looking at Picasso’s work.  Move your eyes over the piece you’re looking at and start drawing.  You’re essentially doodling.  Just practicing.

You can also try my gesture drawing workshop which teaches a very Picasso-esque technique:

Part 1: INTRODUCTION

Part 2: GEOMETRIC SHAPES

Part 3: ADDING DETAILS

Part 4: ABSTRACTION

Homework:

Pick one of Picasso’s works that particularly move you.  You’ll find plenty of images online.

See also:

35 PART daily journal exercise

Weekly artist exploration/journaling series INTRO

Weekly artist exploration/journaling series Week 1 parts 1-6 FRIDA KAHLO

Weekly artist exploration/journaling series Week 2 Part 1- PICASSO

Weekly artist exploration/journaling series: Week 2 Part 1 #Picasso #arttherapy

WEEK 2 PART 1: PICASSO

Art washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life.

PABLO PICASSO

Picasso is THE ARTIST.  THE ONE.  My teacher.  His personality is maddening.  His talent, monstrous.

Go to the library.  Go online.  Pull out your books and notebooks.  Watch videos.  Start researching.  Start the immersion.

Write his name.

See A SUM OF DECONSTRUCTIONS

Tomorrow we draw.

See also:

Weekly artist exploration/journaling series INTRO

Weekly artist exploration/journaling series Week 1 parts 1-6 FRIDA KAHLO

Weekly artist exploration/journaling series: Week 1 Part 6 SELF-PORTRAIT #FridaKahlo #arttherapy

WEEK 1 PART 6: Frida Kahlo

I paint self-portraits because I am so often alone, because I am the person I know best. – Frida

Today we’ll do a self-portrait in Frida’s style.

But not trying too hard.  Don’t use a mirror.  Just muse.  It’s not about being Frida on the outside, but on the inside.

Last spring, I made my muse Jocelyn Louise into Frida:

Recall my daughter dressed as Frida Kahlo at SFMOMA:

Since my subjects have always been my sensations, my states of mind and the profound reactions that life has been producing in me, I have frequently objectified all this in figures of myself, which were the most sincere and real thing that I could do in order to express what I felt inside and outside of myself. – Frida

Next artist:

PICASSO!

See also:

35 PART daily journal exercise

Weekly artist exploration/journaling series INTRO

Week 1 Part 1 FRIDA KAHLO

Week 1 Part 2 FRIDA KAHLO: BREATHING

Week 1 Part 3 FRIDA KAHLO: ART ABOUT ART

Week 1 Part 4 FRIDA KAHLO: ARTIST WORDS

Week 1 Part 5 FRIDA KAHLO: RELATIONSHIP

Weekly artist exploration/journaling series: Week 1 Part 5 RELATIONSHIP #FridaKahlo #arttherapy

WEEK 1 PART 5: Frida Kahlo

Our relationship with our journal is important.  It’s a safe place to purge in, to refocus, to process.  By researching an artist and using our journal as a notebook, we develop the relationship further and connect ourselves with art history by becoming it ourselves.  Write in your journal about your relationship with it and your relationship with Frida.

I just wrote in my journal: Deep breath.  Fall back and see who catches you.  Trust that the net is there.  And if no one catches you- then start flying.  That’s what these new wings are made for.  They’re not just baby sprouts anymore.  They are fully formed and strong.  You just have to start exercising them.
The entry brings to mind Frida’s words:

Feet?  Why do I need you,  If I have wings to fly.

Frida certainly is in everything I create.  My Frida series is one of my favorite series I have done.  My Frida sock monkey is one of my favorite crafts I have done.

What about Frida’s relationship with and influence on other artists?  What do other artists say about Frida?

Research online and in books.

Frida with photographer Nickolas Muray

The one of me is eternally grateful for the Happiness that the half of you so generously gave. – Nickolas Muray to Frida

Through her paintings, she breaks all the taboos of the woman’s body and of female sexuality. – Diego Rivera on Frida

Frida with hand earrings from Picasso

The art of Frida Kahlo is a ribbon around a bomb. – Andre Breton about Frida

The Other Surrealists: Trotsky (sitting), his wife, Natlia Sedova,the Painter Diego Rivera (back right), his wife, the Painter, Frieda Kahlo, Behind Kahlo, the French Surrealist, Andre Breton

From archive.com:

… Breton arrived in 1938 and was enchanted with Mexico, which he found to be a ‘naturally surrealist’ country, and with Kahlo’s painting.  Partly through his initiative, she was offered a show at the fashionable Julian Levy Gallery in New York later in 1938, and Breton himself wrote a rhetorical catalogue preface.  The show was a triumph, and about half the paintings were sold.  In 1939, Breton suggested a show in Paris, and offered to arrange it. Kahlo, who spoke no French, arrived in France to find that Breton had not even bothered to get her work out of customs.  The enterprise was finally rescued by Marcel Duchamp, and the show opened about six weeks late. It was not a financial success, but the reviews were good, and the Louvre bought a picture for the Jeu de Paume.  Kahlo also won praise from Kandinsky and Picasso.  She had, however, conceived a violent dislike for what she called ‘this bunch of coocoo lunatic sons of bitches of surrealists.’  She did not renounce Surrealism immediately. in January 1940, for example, she was a participant (with Rivera) in the International Exhibition of Surrealism held in Mexico City.  Later, she was to be vehement in her denials that she had ever been a true Surrealist. ‘They thought I was a Surrealist,’ she said, ‘but I wasn’t. I never painted dreams. I painted my own reality.’

Find photos of Frida, cut, print etc. and glue them in your journal.

In part 6:

We’ll do a self-portrait in Frida’s style.

Friday:

PICASSO!

See also:

35 PART daily journal exercise

Weekly artist exploration/journaling series INTRO

Week 1 Part 1 FRIDA KAHLO

Week 1 Part 2 FRIDA KAHLO: BREATHING

Week 1 Part 3 FRIDA KAHLO: ART ABOUT ART

Week 1 Part 4 FRIDA KAHLO: ARTIST WORDS

Kat’s Drawing Tutorial: Gesture Drawing PART 4 of 4- abstraction. #artschool

In this 4 part tutorial, we move through analysis of form, to drawing details to abstraction through gesture drawing.

See Part 1: INTRODUCTION

See Part 2: GEOMETRIC SHAPES 

See Part 3: ADDING DETAILS 

Now we move to finding the image and abstract it through gestures.  What I mean by that is- you find the form in marks you have made.  You are limiting your decisions.

STEP 1:

On a blank piece of paper, doodle random lines.  Random, but with some thought!  Think opposites.  Do hard and soft lines.  Straight, zigzag, curvy.  Staccato, continuous.  Shapes, scribbles.  Just fill the page without thinking about WHAT you are going to do in Step 2.  Change hands.  Left hand.  Right hand. Turn the paper.

STEP 2:

Find the image in the marks you have made.  This goes back to part 2 of this tutorial where you are looking for simple shapes.

We’ll start with a photo.  (Let’s use the same one we used in Parts 1-3).

Now look for geometrics that emulate the actual form.  Use only the lines you have!  That’s it!  YOU ARE LIMITED!  This will force you to change the way you approach form!  Do you see lines that somewhat liken the eyes?  The mouth?  The cheek? etc.

 

See how I am allowing the existing line to shape the form.  E.G. I’m thinking eye but it’s an UNUSUAL eye!

   

STEP 3:

Start adding details and shading and finalizing the form.  Blacken out areas.  Add lines if you need to, but just minimal.  Use the eraser to draw out light.  You will end up with a Picasso-esque image!

   

Feel free to email questions and share your work!!!

CONTACT ME AT Email

This tutorial was originally taught to me by artist, Martin Guderna.

See also:

DRAPERY TUTORIAL

PORTRAIT TUTORIAL

“Understanding Picasso” through index cards, china marker, coffee and @RebeccaRaw and @jocelyn_louise

Understanding Picasso. PORZIO, DOMENICO AND VALSECCHI, MARCO; WITH AN INTRODUCTION BY THOMAS M. MESSER.  New York: Newsweek Books, 1974. First English language edition, Hard Cover.

Rebecca lent me this  amazing book that I devoured by sketching.  My muses let me understand through play and mark making.

“Rebecca and Jocelyn” Quick sketch (china marker and coffee on index card) as inspired by Picasso’s Silenus and Companions Dancing, 1933

“Jocelyn”  Quick sketch (china marker and coffee on index card) as inspired by Picasso’s Portrait of Françoise, 1946

Fantastic book!

From ANTIQBOOK.COM:

A comprehensive joyous monography on Picasso’s life, work, and people who wrote about him. Written shortly after his death at 91 (April 8, 1973). The celebrated Picasso creating until his death was indisputably one of the outstanding geniuses in the entire history of Western art. With so much written about Picasso, this book was conceived and produced for those that wish to comprehend the ‘phenomenon’ of Picasso in its complex entirety. A proud, unforgettable celebration of life was Picasso’s gift to the world, in his art. Numerous photographs of Picasso, friends and family. Two major sections are, a biography of the artists by Porzio and a critique of his career by Valsecchi. A revealing section called “Picasso on Picasso,” is 12 pages of comments about his work by the artist himself. The authors present 144 color plates in chronological order from his best works, many full page, along with many black and white drawings, and fold-out of Guernica. Here are turn of the century paintings reflecting his indebtedness to the masters of Impressionism, haunting canvases from his ”Blue Period,” the classic elegance of the “Rose Period,” realistic portraits of a master draftsman, the invention of Cubism, experiments with Surrealism, his collages, sculpture, and the subjects that fascinated him: bullfights, clowns, the horror of war and women in all their mystery and sensuality. Additionally 24 pages of excerpts about Picasso from the writings of Gertrude Stein, Guillaume Apollinaire, Jean Cocteau, Roland Penrose, Albert Moavia, and others. Sculptor Henry Moore best summarized the man’s achievement when he said, “Picasso has taught the us above all to see the world in a new way.” Brown cloth boards and spine, gilt figure to front board, gilt lettering to spine.

Art Book Quote of the Day from ‘The Silent Studio’ #Picasso #Jacqueline #photos

today, at Notre-Dame de Vie,

Jacqueline’s flock of sheep

grazes beneath olive trees

of a studio now locked,

while Igor appears to watch

for someone he never knew


I was so lucky to find this book  The Silent Studio (1st edition, 1976) by David Douglas Duncan at Vancouver’s Macleods’s Books (451 Pender Street) awhile back. MAP

The book itself is a work of art.  Filled with photos by Duncan of Picasso’s studio after his death in 1973.  Haunting, sad, magical, silent.  The book (no captions and mainly photos) is a love letter to Picasso’s last wife Jacqueline Roque.

Jacqueline nearly perished after Picasso died Sunday noon, April 8th, 1973. For two years she languished in total seclusion...

Everyone tried to shield Jacqueline from the obvious agony of having professionals, court-ordered, inside her home cataloguing everything, even the contents of Pablo’s and her clothes closets.  Only rarely was a voice heard in that enormous house, then it was muted.  The experts have now returned to Paris.  Now it’s over.  She seems so relieved and exhausted. (from Preface)