Frida Kahlo, Muere el 13 de Julio de 1954

I hope the exit is joyful and I hope never to return. – Frida Kahlo

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Frida Kahlo July 6, 1907 – July 13, 1954 (china marker, dry pastel on newsprint)

Nothing is absolute. Everything changes, everything moves, everything revolves, everything flies and goes away. – Frida Kahlo

SOLD: STUDIO CLEARANCE SALE: Painting entitled “The House,” 1998

Raising FUNDS, clearing SPACE and LETTING GO.

STUDIO CLEARANCE SALE

(Vancouver BC)

FOR SALE:

A favorite piece from my 1998 solo exhibit: Asta Sollilja of Summerhouses

SOLD

e-transfer or paypal: britakatarina@gmail.com

CONTACT: EMAIL

You pick up in West End, Vancouver

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The House, 1998, Katarina Thorsen

It was a house and a stable in one.  All that was visible of the inner, wooden shell was the door and its frame, the door so small, the threshold so high that one had to stoop on entering.  Down in the stable it was cold and dark, the air sour with the smell of earth, the toadstools flabby, but when the trapdoor was lifted a faint gleam shone down from the loft.  There were mangers along the sides, and in the farther wall a gap just wide enough to allow access to a hay barn that Bjartur proposed building behind the house… – Halldor Laxness

Acrylic on Canvas

36″ x 48″

(Note the piece is made of two canvases, 24″ x 36″ each.  It is currently framed, with a beautiful handmade cedar frame by Ralph Bowers- in frame measures 37″ x 49″)

THE EXHBIT WAS INSPIRED BY INDEPENDENT PEOPLE

There is no more important novel to me than INDEPENDENT PEOPLE by Halldor Laxness (1902 – 1998), Icelandic novelist, awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1955.  I own several copies of the book.  Here is the dust jacket from my hardcover English edition (1946, Alfred A. Knopf, New York):

The exhibit:

The novel inspired a large exhibit in 1998 of multiple paintings, drawings and quilts.  These were exhibited at the beautiful Nordic Heritage Museum in Seattle, ironically just a month after Laxness’s passing.

Exhibit Synopsis:

In 1983, through my Scandinavian Literature class at the University of British Columbia (taught by my mentor Peter Stenberg), I was introduced to an extraordinary novel which forever embedded itself into my heart. I honestly didn’t know at the time how much it affected me, for my mind was cluttered with other university courses and accompanying distractions, but I did know that the book was very important, and indeed it was the one I have returned to again and again.

The novel is Independent People by Nobel prize winner Halldor Laxness, beautifully translated from Icelandic by J. A. Thompson, 1946, Borzoi Books, Alfred A. Knopf, New York. The novel was reissued in paperback by Vintage international, January 1997.

It is an epic tale of a farm family in rural Iceland around the time of World War I. The central character is a rough and self-proclaimed independent sheep farmer called Bjartur, who early on establishes his croft in which the epic and isolated events of his family are played out. Bjartur is the centre of the story, but the most striking character is his daughter Asta Sollilja. This lonely pubescent girl is the heart of the novel, embodying beauty, pity, tragedy; she is the face of Iceland. Her relationship with her father is awkward, heavy, yet extremely endearing.

At once inspired by the words of Halldor Laxness and my Scandinavian heritage, I chose to do a visual essay on Asta, an essay that should allow the viewer to understand the character without having read the book first, but to inspire them to read it. The paintings and the quilts in the exhibit are strictly my personal interpretation of Asta, focusing on emotion and relationships with other characters rather than specific themes. The quilts are an important feature of the exhibit, providing a visual and tactile commentary- on women’s hand work, the bed covering as protection, the bed where birth, dreams, rape, death occur.

Central quote to the exhibit: page 351

He did not know what to say in the face of such sorrow. He sat in silence by his sister’s side in the spring vendure, which was too young; and the hidden strings in his breast began to quiver, and to sound. This was the first time that he had ever looked into the labyrinth of the human soul. He was very far from understanding what he saw. But what was of more value, he felt and suffered with her. In years that were to come he relived this memory in song, in the most beautiful song the world has ever known. For the understanding in the soul’s defencelessness, of the conflict between two poles, is not the source of the greatest song. The source of the greatest song is sympathy. Sympathy with Asta Sollilja on earth.

Asta Sollilja, 1998 (donated to the Missing Women’s Legacy Society, 2002) 
Detail from Bjartur Quilt, 1998

Feedback:

I was honored to receive amazing feedback from the show.  I treasure this comment in particular:

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Burr, Washington, Jefferson, King George sock monkeys. Hamilton in my heart.

I had planned to be in New York City on July 28th this summer, sitting at the Rogers Theatre with my daughter celebrating, watching Hamilton, the Musical.  We would have just completed two days of sock monkey workshops at Graham Windham with children and families (Eliza Hamilton’s orphanage).  I was going to bring my sock monkeys of the entire main cast of the musical.

Sadly, fate/destiny/universe had other plans.  I didn’t get the gigs I expected to have over the summer and as of May, I found myself all of a sudden struggling again to get by.  Dang.  More setbacks and lack of consistent work made things even harder.

And so the tickets were sold and plans changed.  And I admit, I don’t think it hit me till today how truly heartbroken I am.  But that is OK.

What I get from Hamilton is not about going to the show itself.  It is about the creative process.  It is about art about history.  It is about the healing power of art.  And the tenacity of art.  I have been creating every day.  For I am an artist with no choice.  That is what I love about Hamilton and that dream hasn’t died.  The message of the creation of Hamilton lives in my heart.

So today, as part of my studio clearance, raising funds and letting go, I have decided to release 4 of my sock monkeys and regroup.  Start fresh.  Blast the soundtrack.  Surrender. And like Lin and Alexander, write my way out.

On my ETSY SHOP:


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My Alexander Hamilton sock monkey, I am pleased to write, lives with my daughter and he spent 4 months travelling to England, Sweden, Southeast Asia and across Canada…

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I will be collecting materials over the next while, and once my Fall work routine putters along, I hope to begin the cast all over again.

Check out:

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Heron Panel donated to “Hear Me Now” youth film fest

As part of the 100 Herons Art Project that has been supporting arts programming for refugee and immigrant youth, this panel will be donated to the HEAR ME NOW film festival for their silent auction!

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“Muslim Food Bank’s HOPE for Youth Program (Healing Opportunities through Prevention and Education) is hosting The Hear Me Now Film Festival on September 9, 2017 at the Shadbolt Theatre.

This will be our first Film Festival where we will be screening digital stories created by local Muslim Youth ages 12-18. Along with that for entertainment we will showcase a variety of talented local Muslim Youth. This program is a platform for Muslim Youth to share their voices, experiences and stories in the community at large. The event will also feature presentations and displays about the Muslim Food bank’s HOPE for Youth programs.”

Also check out:Screen Shot 2017-08-27 at 10.43.30 AM

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‘Asta Sollilja of Summerhouses’ exhibit

My 1998 solo exhibit: Asta Sollilja of Summerhouses

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ONE OF THE PIECES FROM THE SHOW:

The House, 1998, Katarina Thorsen

It was a house and a stable in one.  All that was visible of the inner, wooden shell was the door and its frame, the door so small, the threshold so high that one had to stoop on entering.  Down in the stable it was cold and dark, the air sour with the smell of earth, the toadstools flabby, but when the trapdoor was lifted a faint gleam shone down from the loft.  There were mangers along the sides, and in the farther wall a gap just wide enough to allow access to a hay barn that Bjartur proposed building behind the house… – Halldor Laxness

Acrylic on Canvas

36″ x 48″

(Note the piece is made of two canvases, 24″ x 36″ each.  It is currently framed, with handmade cedar frame by Ralph Bowers- in frame measures 37″ x 49″)

In my private collection, Vancouver BC

The Book:

There is no more important novel to me than INDEPENDENT PEOPLE by Halldor Laxness (1902 – 1998), Icelandic novelist, awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1955.  I own several copies of the book.  Here is the dust jacket from my hardcover English edition (1946, Alfred A. Knopf, New York):

The exhibit:

The novel inspired a large exhibit in 1998 of multiple paintings, drawings and quilts.  These were exhibited at the beautiful Nordic Heritage Museum in Seattle, ironically just a month after Laxness’s passing.

Exhibit Synopsis:

In 1983, through my Scandinavian Literature class at the University of British Columbia (taught by my mentor Peter Stenberg), I was introduced to an extraordinary novel which forever embedded itself into my heart. I honestly didn’t know at the time how much it affected me, for my mind was cluttered with other university courses and accompanying distractions, but I did know that the book was very important, and indeed it was the one I have returned to again and again.

The novel is Independent People by Nobel prize winner Halldor Laxness, beautifully translated from Icelandic by J. A. Thompson, 1946, Borzoi Books, Alfred A. Knopf, New York. The novel was reissued in paperback by Vintage international, January 1997.

It is an epic tale of a farm family in rural Iceland around the time of World War I. The central character is a rough and self-proclaimed independent sheep farmer called Bjartur, who early on establishes his croft in which the epic and isolated events of his family are played out. Bjartur is the centre of the story, but the most striking character is his daughter Asta Sollilja. This lonely pubescent girl is the heart of the novel, embodying beauty, pity, tragedy; she is the face of Iceland. Her relationship with her father is awkward, heavy, yet extremely endearing.

At once inspired by the words of Halldor Laxness and my Scandinavian heritage, I chose to do a visual essay on Asta, an essay that should allow the viewer to understand the character without having read the book first, but to inspire them to read it. The paintings and the quilts in the exhibit are strictly my personal interpretation of Asta, focusing on emotion and relationships with other characters rather than specific themes. The quilts are an important feature of the exhibit, providing a visual and tactile commentary- on women’s hand work, the bed covering as protection, the bed where birth, dreams, rape, death occur.

Central quote to the exhibit: page 351

He did not know what to say in the face of such sorrow. He sat in silence by his sister’s side in the spring vendure, which was too young; and the hidden strings in his breast began to quiver, and to sound. This was the first time that he had ever looked into the labyrinth of the human soul. He was very far from understanding what he saw. But what was of more value, he felt and suffered with her. In years that were to come he relived this memory in song, in the most beautiful song the world has ever known. For the understanding in the soul’s defencelessness, of the conflict between two poles, is not the source of the greatest song. The source of the greatest song is sympathy. Sympathy with Asta Sollilja on earth.

Asta Sollilja, 1998 (donated to the Missing Women’s Legacy Society, 2002) 
Detail from Bjartur Quilt, 1998

Feedback:

I was honored to receive amazing feedback from the show.  I treasure this comment in particular:

 

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A visit to Artrageous Pictures and Framing!

It was wonderful to finally have a visit with Bill Pomeroy at Artrageous Pictures and Framing on Commercial Drive today!

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LOCATIONS:

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FRIDA!!!

Check out Artrageous on:

FACEBOOK:

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TWITTER:

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INSTAGRAM:

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I LOVE that Artrageous supports artists and has several extraordinary pieces for sale at the shop: LINK

I’m looking forward to seeing how the shop frames the fabulous esteem hearts created by participants in  the Team Training workshops I co-facilitate with Beverley Pomeroy (yes, a relation- Bill’s sister)!

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Stay tuned for a special collaborative offering with Artrageous Pictures and Framing!

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Bill, Pamela and Lucky

Bill and Pamela Pomeroy have owned Artrageous since 2000 and after purchasing Ostersons Framing in August of 2013 have now renamed this location North Shore Artrageous.

Bill was a framer at Ostersons for 10 years during his twenties before owning Artrageous. He has now come full circle by purchasing Ostersons, the store where his career began in the community he calls home.

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Bill’s beagle Lucky and the squirrel. K. Thorsen, 2016, chinamarker on newsprint

 

The permanent analogy of things by images which participate in the life of truth.

 

Autopsy

“I took a deep breath and listened to the old brag of my heart. I am, I am, I am.”
Sylvia Plath, The Bell Jar

TB

What am I trying to convey in my work?  Is it of value?  Does it matter?

I remind myself that it doesn’t, that it CANNOT MATTER how I “fit in” to current zeitgeist or if my work has “value.”  I just do it.

It is a biological function.

PROCESS is my art form, obsessive ongoing process, either when teaching it, facilitating it, doing it.

So there in lies what MATTERS.  The PROCESS.

Process art is an artistic movement as well as a creative sentiment where the end product of art and craft, the objet d’art, is not the principal focus. The ‘process’ in process art refers to the process of the formation of art: the gathering, sorting, collating, associating, patterning, and moreover the initiation of actions and proceedings.

Process art is concerned with the actual doing and how actions can be defined as an actual work of art; seeing the art as pure human expression. Process art often entails an inherent motivation, rationale, and intentionality. Therefore, art is viewed as a creative journey or process, rather than as a deliverable or end product. – Wiki

I have come to terms with the fact that my particular imagery is a stream of consciousness process.  I suppose I am interpreting text in my illustration projects, but it seems more that I land on a particular word or phrase and play from there.  So the resulting image becomes a type of riff or image play.

Fleshy Tomb

I have tried other ways to work, but only my personal stream of consciousness expression makes me feel authentic.

I am thoroughly enjoying Caroline Spurgeon’s book, Shakespeare’s Imagery- and what it tells us (1935) as she contemplates the evidence of Shakespeare’s thoughts in his imagery.

The bare fact that germinating seeds of falling leaves are actually another expression of the processes we see at work in human life and death, thrills me, as it must others, with a sense of being here in presences of a great mystery, which could we only understand it, would explain life and death itself.

Babes in the Wood

For me, drawing and embroidering the drawings is to lie down into life and take time to look at the PROCESS as it slowly unfolds.  It is about TRUTH.

I would actually argue that the current art period is PROCESS.

Y-STR

… the permanent analogy of things by images which participate in the life of truth… – Percy Bysshe Shelley

Check out:

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And which is what I think the thing that we call the Arts contains something that’s kind of alive. And I, I think image is the right word for it, and what the biological function of this thing we call the images or the arts might be. Because my argument is we wouldn’t of dragged it through all our evolutionary stages unless it had a biological function. So, that’s kind of what I’m going to be talking about. And then, work that I’ve been doing with students and scientists about this very thing. Weinman so I think, you know, when we’re little all of us are really connected to our inner artist and then the majority of us, as we get older, cut that off. – Lynda Barry

And:

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And:

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Embroidered drawings and forensic taphonomy

My passion project, Molly- a true crime analysis, centres around a 63 year old Vancouver cold case.

On January 15, 1953, the skeletal remains of two children were found in the forest of Stanley Park in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.  The victims became known as the Babes in the Wood.  The physical evidence indicated that the children were killed using a hatchet and confidently pointed to the involvement of a woman, likely the children’s mother.  Unsolved for over 63 years, the double homicide still haunts the city and fuels the imaginations of Vancouverites.  Several theories have been explored and many leads and tips have been followed; yet the identities of the two victims remain unknown.

Molly- a true crime analysis illustrates my research into this heartbreaking mystery.

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Sparrow feet, a gift from Hannah Ackeral

My involvement initially began as a volunteer researcher on the Babes in the Wood task force from 2003 to 2004.

This passion project- an illustrated book- is as much about the PROCESS and my deep involvement as it is about the cold case and the ultimate “end” product.  And yes- that process.  The creative process is incredibly magical and rewarding.  The project is directing itself in a sense, and I am following and trusting.

The book will include text (facts and interpretation), illustrations (including magic realism), photographs, primary sources, physical evidence, circumstantial evidence and artifacts.

I am currently reworking the text and illustrating.  I am experimenting with embroidered drawings.

Why embroidered drawings?

Certain drawings (in particular chapter headings) are embroidered as a means to reflect the act of connecting the dots and weaving together timelines, evidence and research.  The stitches are footsteps on a map.  It reflects deep thought and the passage of time.  It is historical.  Traditional.  Sacred.  It is about strengthening the fragile.  It fascinates me that a medium so cheap and easily torn such as newsprint becomes strong and hardy when layered and sewn together.  It can be manipulated and folded, handled, and only gains a lovelier patina.   There is something magical in that.

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… And when they were dead
The robins so red
Brought strawberry leaves
And over them spread;
And all the day long,
The green branches among,
They’d prettily whistle
And this was their song-
‘Poor babes in the wood!
Sweet babes in the wood!
Oh the sad fate of
The babes in the wood!’

“The Babes in the Wood,” Anonymous (ca 1595). Public domain.

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The Babes in the Wood, in progress

For serious inquiries, contact: Peter Breeze

MOLLY TERESA O’DWYER APRIL 25, 1924

Molly Teresa O’Dwyer (April 25, 1924 Costel, Ireland- November 6, 1947; suicide, age 23 in Vancouver, BC, Canada (Mountainview Cemetery, Vancouver)

My passion project, Molly- a true crime analysis, continues.  Stay tuned.

On January 15, 1953, the skeletal remains of two children were found in the forest of Stanley Park in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.  The victims became known as the Babes in the Wood.  The physical evidence indicated that the children were killed using a hatchet and confidently pointed to the involvement of a woman, likely the children’s mother.  Unsolved for over 63 years, the double homicide still haunts the city as the identities of the two victims remain unknown.

My involvement began when I was a volunteer researcher on the Babes in the Wood task force from 2003 to 2004.  My work interpreted the cold case within the historical context of a Post War city, folding in theory as to the psychological behavior of the offender or offenders.

To enrich the profile of the unknown woman involved, I searched for comparison cases regarding troubled women in post war Vancouver and came across a story about the suicide of Molly O’Dwyer, a young immigrant woman who had relocated to the city from Alberta in July 1947.  I printed out the article for my files.

In one glorious 3 AM AHA! moment, I recalled an obscure lead regarding a woman named Molly from Alberta who headed west in 1947 with her two children and was never heard from again.

13 years later, I have taken that initial headline about a suicide and, through extensive research, mapped out Molly’s entire life and the incredible parallels to the Babes in the Wood.

My thesis dares to ask, “What if?”  – Katarina Thorsen

10 Tuesdays. 10 Fridas. Frida No. 4: Frida and her Magic Cone of Truth

I’m celebrating my blog with an art event. The event honors the woman who inspires me to keep it going as an artist: Frida Kahlo.

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For 10 Tuesdays, I am creating/posting 10 different portraits of Frida Kahlo in some form/medium or another. It may be a drawing, an object, a doll, whatever… A surprise. I will be posting one a week.

Recall:

Frida No. 1: Sock Doll

Frida No. 2: The Dream

Frida No. 3: The Chakras

Frida No. 4: Frida and her magic cone of truth!

Perfect for circle discussions.

With humor and gentle nudge, Frida encourages you to investigate and seek the truth!

    China marker, marker, acrylic on white 6.5″ Munnyworld Trikky  

Character study (china marker on newsprint 12 x 18):

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 Sit with Frida and speak the truth.  From the heart.  

Today’s discussion item:

SUCCESS – FAILURE

Write and draw about it.

I’ll share my reflections on the topic tomorrow.

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Tell me I’m clever, Tell me I’m kind, Tell me I’m talented, Tell me I’m cute, Tell me I’m sensitive, Graceful and wise, Tell me I’m perfect – But tell me the truth.
– Shel Silverstein

10 Tuesdays. 10 Fridas. Art Blog Event. Frida No. 2: “The Dream”

I’m celebrating my blog with an art event.

The event honors the woman who inspires me to keep it going as an artist: Frida Kahlo.

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For 10 Tuesdays, I am creating/posting 10 different portraits of Frida Kahlo in some form/medium or another.  It may be a drawing, an object, a doll, whatever…  A surprise.  I will be posting one a week.

Recall Item Frida No. 1: Sock Doll

FRIDA NO. 2: THE DREAM

This chinamarker panel on masonite board is one of my most personal pieces and measures 18″ x 24″ by 1/4″

It is part of a personal art therapy series of panels.

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 Frida Kahlo is an icon and muse that I return to again and again.  I am infused by Frida and I consider myself a Kahloist.  She epitomizes the artist and woman in pain.  As I was going through my divorce, I was driven to draw Frida as a child.  The medium I chose (or it chose me) was china marker on masonite board.  Child-Frida was a light to help me process through and to lift me out of the hole of depression.

I LOVED making this series even though they were done at 3 AM with my heart pounding and anxiety choking me.  They allowed me to release the pain in the moment.  They allowed me to process the pain in my therapy sessions.

The 12 pieces (only a few remain in my personal collection) illustrate the power of art to process life changes.  Heavily, honestly.  I never tend to go light.

And the pieces have been protested: LINK

 

Email me for purchasing options (and details about the dream).

CONTACT KATARINA: Email

  

10 Tuesdays. 10 Fridas. Art blog event. Frida No. 1: sock doll. #recycledcraft

I’m celebrating my blog with an art event.

The event honors the woman who inspires me to keep it going as an artist: Frida Kahlo.

(How many of you that know me are right now rolling your eyes and saying, “duh”…!?!?  I realize I am a tad obsessed.)

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For the next 10 Tuesdays, I will be creating 10 different portraits of Frida Kahlo in some form/medium or another.  It may be a drawing, an object, a doll, whatever…  A surprise.  I will be posting one a week.

These new and unique Frida arts and crafts are my own designs and will be for sale here on the blog for a special presale price before I put the item onto my online store.  The sale price for each product will last for one week, then it gets listed if not sold here.

Frida No. 1: the sock doll

This Frida is made out of 100% recycled, gently used product.  Her body is made from a work sock and her hair is made from a black sock.  Her skull face has a white sock as ground color.  The dia de los muertos/sugar skull face is embroidered.  All the thread is from my mom’s old sewing basket.  Her tattooed arms feature Frida portraits from discontinued socks from Haight and Ashbury, San Francisco.  Her dress is made from vintage materials and her flowers are made from an antique hand-crocheted doily.  The little lamb is made from an old blanket.   The doll is about 24 inches tall with skirt (body about 18 inches).

PRICE: $175.00 CAD (Shipping free in Canada).  Email me for purchasing details.

CONTACT KATARINA: Email

UPDATE May 27, 2015 : ITEM IS SOLD

     

   —

There is nothing more precious than laughter.

Frida Kahlo

 

Sock sparrow. #recycledcraft

   

My personal therapy is randomly picking up an old scrap, grabbing needle and thread and seeing what happens. In this case, I was donated a cozy pair of wooly socks and their color just told me- make a sparrow

Recall: Pay attention to the birds: SPARROW

“The sparrow reflects self-worth.  If a Sparrow totem has entered your life, ask yourself if you know your own self-worth.  The sparrow will show you that even a common little bird can triumph.  The song sparrow reflects the chakra energy awakening from the heart and throat.  It reminds us to sing out our own song of dignity and self-worth.”
  

My Dress Hangs There. One of a kind Frida Kahlo portrait paper dress.

UPDATE: May 2, 2015 1:48 PM- DRESS IS SOLD!  

It will be worn at the Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo in Detroit exhibit!

THANK YOU for your patronage- Laura Mack!

***SOLD!***

It’s truly one of a kind double sided wearable street art/ wall hanging.

These are my own interpretations of Frida Kahlo with original drawings and embroidery.

FITS SIZES 4-6

  
  

UPDATE:

WORN BY LAURA MACK IN DETROIT JUNE 3, 2015

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Evolution of a #wheatpaste. Portrait of @ThaneKoi, one year later

What is the point of a piece that is meant to be temporary?  Work that is impermanent reminds us that nothing in life is permanent, that every state is temporary and transitory.  Contemplating this concept teaches us to embrace change in our life, instead of working against it.  When others notice a piece that is there one day and gone the next it creates a kind of energy/excitement within the community. – Keri Smith

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My portrait of Thane Koi, Feb 11, 2013 (chinamarker on newsprint)
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Emily Castellanos wheatpasting Thane, 119 East Cordova, Vancouver BC Feb 13, 2013

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Today Feb 3, 2014

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The elements and the interaction by the community has become essential to my creative process.

My china marker portraits on @bypoststreet’s limited edition Winter Collection t-shirts!

The bypoststreet limited edition Winter collection t-shirts now available at bypoststreet.com!

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@bypoststreet features unisex luxury and sportswear inspired t-shirts designed by our creative director. Our eco-friendly luxurious bamboo/cotton cloth is milled in Canada and our t-shirts are designed and produced locally in Vancouver. Our collections feature limited edition portraits by our in-house artist. All our t-shirts are produced in fixed number impressions and are individually examined and hand-marked by our creative director with impression number.

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@bypoststreet celebrates influential personalities, leading artistic talent and street culture, and rides the new collaborative wave that combines art, music, fashion and social media. Their customers feel the excitement of anticipating and collecting the limited edition printed apparel and gain a sense of satisfaction from purchasing a product that is produced and manufactured locally. They embrace the guerilla marketing philosophy of free and accessible art to engage their customers who might never step foot in a gallery. @bypoststreet facilitates artistic expression through interactive art events and introduce new artistic talent to the customer.

WINTER COLLECTION:

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The Editor

A leader is one who knows the way, goes the way, and shows the way. – John C. Maxwell

An editor must have the heart and stomach of a monarch. An editor must be a team leader, ruthlessly curating editorial spreads and irreverently forecasting the future. The editor must epitomize style and blaze the trail while leading by example. @bypoststreet finds all these qualities and more in Emmanuelle Alt, the muse for The Editor t-shirt. 29 prints made, each t-shirt hand-marked with impression number.

BUY

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The Stylist

“Fashion endures, but style changes.” – Coco Chanel

Supplying, curating, envisioning, accessorizing is all part of the job of a stylist, but styling means more than planning videos and photoshoots, pinning to fit and steaming the garment. Styling is to hone the craft and to live the art; it is to exude confidence and style in every walk of life. @bypoststreet pays homage to the exquisite Carine Roitfeld with The Stylist limited edition print.  29 prints made, each t-shirt hand-marked with impression number.

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The Fashion Maniac

Taste every fruit of every tree in the garden at least once. It is an insult to creation not to experience it fully. Temperance is wickedness. – Stephen Fry

With @bypoststreet’s Collection 4 limited edition bamboo/cotton t-shirt, The Fashion Maniac, we throw out timidity by bowing to the trailblazers that change the face of fashion by breaking the rules. Take the cue, embrace your passion, try it all and thereby redefine yourself.  29 prints made, each t-shirt hand-marked with impression number featuring a portrait of the fashion maniac herself, Anna Dello Russo.

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The Fashion Icon

Clear your energy, honor your rhythm, live your vision. – George Denslow

We stand on the shoulders of giants that lead by example. With @bypoststreet’s Collection 4 limited edition bamboo/cotton t-shirt, The Fashion Icon, we embrace the elegance of our mentors and realize that their passion for free expression in turn inspires us to be our elegant selves. Miroslava Duma, president of Russua’s Buro247, is the portrait choice for the t-shirt.  29 prints made, each t-shirt hand-marked with impression number.

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The Beard

 Commitment is an act, not a word. – Jean Paul Sartre

A full beard takes commitment and in turn our hearts have fully committed to this trendy tended, virile, bushy garden of masculinity. Add some tattoos and we are done. Done. Celebrate the “barba” with @bypoststreet’s Collection 3 limited edition bamboo/cotton t-shirt, The Beard featuring a portrait of bearded model Ricki Hall.  33 prints made, each t-shirt hand-marked with impression number.

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Cara hair up 300 dpi
The Brows

Be yourself- not your idea of what you think somebody else’s idea of yourself should be. – Henry David Thoreau

The eyes may be the window to the soul, but our brows are the visual expression of our thoughts. A defiant angle, a raised surprise, a furrowed wrinkle, a reluctant horizon- our brows do not lie. Express your cocky self with @bypoststreet’s Collection 3 limited edition bamboo/cotton t-shirt, The Brows, featuring a portrait of model Cara Delevingne.  31 prints made, each t-shirt hand-marked with impression number.

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“Drawing on Pain” at Espana Gallery closing early due to protests from tenants.

UPDATE!

It as an interesting experiment to have “Drawing on Pain” exhibited in a lobby gallery. Experiment has to end early as some tenants are expressing concern over the subject matter and have asked that the show be taken down. Understood. Thank you, The Espana Gallery, for the opportunity while it lasted!

The show will end Sept 22.  I just received this message from the curator:

“Unfortunately, tomorrow I have to take your work down from the Espana. The manager has called me to say that a group of people are offended by the nudity, language , etc. And they won’t back off of him. One of these people is the strata council so they are really pressuring him. I have my own thoughts about this, but I don’t really have a choice at this point. I apologize.” 

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DRAWING ON PAIN exhibits my personal therapeutic process as I utilize art to help me process the difficult challenges I have encountered (and continue to encounter) in my life– such as divorce, cancer, my friends’ suicides, financial struggles and planning the road ahead.  I call myself a Kahloist and often find it healing to utilize the image of Frida Kahlo to express that internal pain for me.   By facilitating the need for self-expression through drawing, I lighten the load in my heart.

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Drawing is the honesty of the art. – Salvador Dali

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DRAWING ON PAIN Aug 29- Oct 13, 2013

ESPANA GALLERY

689 Abbott Street, Vancouver BC

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Unfold your wings as you fall. Drawing on Pain at Espana Gallery Aug 29-Oct 13

Jump, and you will find out how to unfold your wings as you fall.
– Ray Bradbury 

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DRAWING ON PAIN Aug 29- Oct 13, 2013

ESPANA GALLERY

689 Abbott Street, Vancouver BC

Curator, sales manager: Angie Heintz 778 773 2861

infor@angieheintz.com

ARTIST’S STATEMENT:

“My painting carries with it the message of pain.” – Frida Kahlo

DRAWING ON PAIN exhibits my personal therapeutic process as I utilize art to help me process the difficult challenges I have encountered (and continue to encounter) in my life– such as divorce, cancer, my friends’ suicides, financial struggles and planning the road ahead.  I call myself a Kahloist and often find it healing to utilize the image of Frida Kahlo to express that internal pain for me.   By facilitating the need for self-expression through drawing, I lighten the load in my heart.

EXHIBIT LIST: DRAWING ON PAIN

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The show is up until Oct 13. at 689 Abbott street ( just buzz #7777 at the door anytime for entrance).

If you are interested in purchasing any of the work shown, please contact Angie Heintz at info@angieheintz.com or call 778.773.2861

Drawing on Pain at Espana Gallery Aug 29-Oct 13: exhibit list

A huge thank you to Angie Heintz and The Espana Gallery and to everyone who attended the August 29, 2013 opening. What a fabulous crowd! Thanks for listening so intently and for your support.

Thank you as well to those who provided interviews for the documentary FEAR NO ART w. Patti Henderson.

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You have all empowered me and I am so grateful for this opportunity!

ARTIST’S STATEMENT:

“My painting carries with it the message of pain.” – Frida Kahlo

DRAWING ON PAIN exhibits my personal therapeutic process as I utilize art to help me process the difficult challenges I have encountered (and continue to encounter) in my life– such as divorce, cancer, my friends’ suicides, financial struggles and planning the road ahead.  I call myself a Kahloist and often find it healing to utilize the image of Frida Kahlo to express that internal pain for me.   By facilitating the need for self-expression through drawing, I lighten the load in my heart.

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The show is up until Oct 13. at 689 Abbott street ( just buzz #7777 at the door anytime for entrance).

If you are interested in purchasing any of the work shown, please contact Angie Heintz at info@angieheintz.com or call 778.773.2861

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EXHIBIT LIST: DRAWING ON PAIN

“Fear No Art” Documentary. A 20 year inquisition w. filmmaker Patti Henderson

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I am so honored to be working with filmmaker Patti Henderson as we revisit a project started twenty years ago.

“Fear No Art” Documentary. A 20 year inquisition.

by Patti Henderson

FEAR NO ART

The documentary will address protests that occurred back in 1991 and my reflections on my art 20+ years later.  We are diving in now (with camera by Julian Bowers) and I LOVE working with Patti and witnessing her creative process.  We are comrades in the feverish need to create.

Patti Henderson
Patti Henderson

Art is a kind of innate drive that seizes a human being and makes him its instrument. The artist is not a person endowed with free will who seeks his own ends, but one who allows art to realize its purpose through him. As a human being he/she may have moods and a will and personal aims, but as an artist he is “man” in a higher sense— he is “collective man”— one who carries and shapes the unconscious, psychic forms of mankind.

― C.G. Jung

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For more on the protests go to:

20 years ago my art was protested

Post no bills: can free art change the world?

Stay tuned for NEXT STEPS!

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Bury me with a China Marker and a pad of newsprint.#essentials. Latest portraits.

Nardwuar
Nardwuar

Nardwuar, the human serviette

Camille Claudel
Camille Claudel

Camille Claudel

Jocelyn Louise
Jocelyn Louise

Jocelyn Louise in my graphic novel

Thane Koi
Thane Koi

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Lyndi Barrett, Anna T Fabulous
Lyndi Barrett, Anna T Fabulous

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Lyndi Barrett

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Anna T Fabulous

As mentioned before, China Marker is my medium of choice for my graphic novel.  When I die, bury me with a fresh china marker box and a pad of newsprint.  Then cremate me ’cause I’m claustrophobic.

Peggy Moffitt
Peggy Moffitt

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Joe Average’s new site! #art #photography

We are SO LUCKY to be able to access more of Joe Average’s work on his new site!  Check it out!  It’s like drinking a cool glass of clear, clean, beautiful water.

Joe Average (born 1957) is a Canadian artist who resides in Vancouver, British Columbia. Diagnosed HIV+ at age 27, Average made the decision to commit the rest of his life to art, and to challenge himself to live by his art.

source

I finally got to meet with Joe Average on August 3, 2012, and I was so moved!  He is one of my biggest inspirations…  Meeting your hero is a spiritual experience.  To discuss art together… not enough words can explain the delight and elation I felt!

My portrait of Joe. I gave him the originals and will wheatpaste prints! (China marker, acrylic on newsprint)
My portrait of Joe and Nadine. I got to meet her! (China marker, acrylic on newsprint)
“Miss Nadine,” Joe Average

Thank you, Joe, for allowing me to draw you!  And for being so generous with your time and inviting me onto you paradise porch!

Joe Average took some fabulous photos of my dog, Tobey!

Also check out:

CBC Radio Interview Jan 16, 2011

For Joe:

“Walking the streets of dreams” wall is growing! #streetart #wheatpaste


 

Thank you Morgan, Justine, Amanda-Lynn, Ernst, Kevin and Anthony at Intersections Media for today’s session and for being my subjects:

Amanda-Lynn added several of her portraits as well!

Neighbors came out to give support, approval and thumbs up! Some great conversations were had!

Morgan (centre), Justine (bottom left), Amanda-Lynn (bottom right), Kevin (top left), Ernst (top right), Anthony (top centre)

See more:

China Marker Bowie and other portraits

Portrait: Jacqueline

Latest updates

This is how we do it

Once it’s up, let it go

Something this fun has got to be illegal!

Beauty in the deterioration…

Joe Average

Wide-eyed with a twist of the lips

Mia More in the morning

While I stand on the roadway…

Walking the streets of dreams

Evolution of a wheatpaste: Justine

Beauty in the deterioration Part 2

Do you know what it takes…?

We’ve gone national!

The Social Life hits the streets!

The Social Life hits the streets! #streetart #wheatpaste #thesociallifeyvr

Graffiti is one of the few tools you have if you have almost nothing.  And even if you don’t come up with a picture to cure world poverty you can make someone smile while they’re having a piss. 

— Banksy (Banging Your Head Against a Brick Wall)

Anna T Fabulous and Josh Langston of The Social Life meet their portraits at last!

Huge thank you to The Social Life, Anna T Fabulous, Josh Langston and Nancy Kirkpatrick for an inspiring session!

Nancy, Josh, Anna

  

Ryan Steele, Joseph

Pasting Molly (Jocelyn Louise)
Pasting Barb

Jocelyn Louise as Molly, styled by Jay Fisher.

Joseph, Barb
Jay, Doug
Adam, Jason, Wenchee, Sam, Hannah
Anna T Fabulous
Josh Langston
Raziel Reid

Following is just a small sample of extraordinary photos by Nancy Kirkpatrick:

See more:

China Marker Bowie and other portraits

Portrait: Jacqueline

Latest updates

This is how we do it

Once it’s up, let it go

Something this fun has got to be illegal!

Beauty in the deterioration…

Joe Average

Wide-eyed with a twist of the lips

Mia More in the morning

While I stand on the roadway…

Walking the streets of dreams

Evolution of a wheatpaste: Justine

Beauty in the deterioration Part 2

Do you know what it takes…?

We’ve gone national!

We’ve gone national!!! #Vancouver to #Toronto. #wheatpaste #streetart

4 portraits were pasted by my team in Toronto this morning!  WOOT!

Huge thank you to Matt and Owen:

“10:07 #wheatpaste cooling in the sink (a little burnt :/)”
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“First up @ohemgee_bleh”
Jocelyn Louise
AJ Gonzales
“Tag team Jocelyn and AJ, Handiwork by Owen.”
Matt Roy
“Last, but not least, doing myself.”

Matt’s reflection:

So it was a pretty interesting experience. We were a bit nervous, mostly cause it was inside public domain and generally busy.

But no one said anything besides a little kid who kept gasping at us like we were doing something wrong (we were haha!).

Got some looks but we just nodded and kept on. Didn’t end up filming any video unfortunately as it got too complicated for us. Just took pics.

Thanks for the portraits. It was so much fun! I will keep you informed of their evolutions 🙂

 M x

 

“11:30 destroying the evidence.”

A little Vancouver session happened yesterday as well, thanks to Maryellen:

“Just Jo”

“Clay’

Read more:

China Marker Bowie and other portraits

Portrait: Jacqueline

Latest updates

This is how we do it

Once it’s up, let it go

Something this fun has got to be illegal!

Beauty in the deterioration…

Joe Average

Wide-eyed with a twist of the lips

Mia More in the morning

While I stand on the roadway…

Walking the streets of dreams

Evolution of a wheatpaste: Justine

Beauty in the deterioration Part 2

Do you know what it takes…?




“Do you know what it takes to do a global art project? People, energy, glue.” #Vancouver #streetart

Do you know what it takes to do [a global art project]? People, energy, glue.

– JR

I met up with Elijah yesterday so he could paste the portrait I created of him and his beloved dog, The Baconator!  Thank you, Elijah, for an inspiring afternoon!

The city’s the best gallery I could imagine. I would never have to make a book and then present it to a gallery and let them decide if my work was nice enough to show it to people. I would control it directly with the public in the streets.

JR

Dialogue:

Street art alters spaces and creates dialogue, and frequently offers subversive critiques on dominant culture. 

Nicolette Mason

I discovered the other day that someone had written racial slurs on one of my pieces:

I prepped birds to cover those words, so as to essentially engage in dialogue visually:

Returning to it yesterday, we saw someone had crossed out the graffiti.